Posts Tagged ‘Common Lisp’

COMFY-6502: hosting at github

May 6, 2008

Mostly to support my own development on multiple computers, I’ve moved my Common Lisp port of COMFY-6502 to github. I chose the name cl-comfy-6502 for the repository, although the “cl” prefix is a bit ugly.

The current snapshot of COMFY-6502.

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COMFY-6502: snapshot

March 5, 2008

Even though it is hardly a finished product, I’ve posted a snapshot of my current CL conversion of COMFY-6502 Not that I expect a huge pent-up demand for the code, but it might be slightly more interesting than the output examples. Thanks to Henry Baker for allowing the release.

The page also contains a link to the TODO file describing my next steps. (Most immediately, my attempt to include JMP elision was messy enough to convince me I need a different class to represent opcodes+arguments as a unit.)

Learning Genera, bit by bit…

November 6, 2007

Having hacked on the COMFY code for a while in Emacs Lisp, I got the itch to move it over to my MacIvory, which has been waiting for real work to do. I’ve crafted some tests in the Emacs Lisp using elk-test (trying to add heirarchical suites-of-suites along the way), and wanted to port them to one of the Common Lisp test frameworks (I’m thinking of checking out Stefil, LIFT, and rt, which I’ve used briefly). While copying the files, I ran into a few issues.

  1. I couldn’t figure out an automatic way to handle line-ending issues in the text files. I ended up locating the file on the Mac OS side in the file browser, Mouse-R clicking to Edit the file, then M-%, C-q [LINE key] [Return] C-q [Return] [Return] ! in Zmacs, then saving to a file on the Ivory file system. (I like the offer to create non-existent directories on a save.) There is probably a Copy File(s) command I could have used to move them en masse, and I should have been able to code up a quick conversion routine or Zmacs keyboard macro, but it worked.
  2. Trying to compile the RT framework, I think I had been misled by my experience in the Genera Development Tutorial. The Common-Lisp mode apparently is Common Lisp the Language, 2d ed. What I was looking for is ANSI-Common-Lisp. The confusion cause all sorts of problems with DEFPACKAGE, and the presence of FUTURE-COMMON-LISP made me even more confused. An e-mail on the SLUG list apparently explains the various Common-Lisp strategies on Genera.

[UPDATE: the old link to the e-mail broke, but gmane.org still has it.]